Event calendar

< 2019 >
September
«
»
Sun
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
  • Breathing Underwater: An Evening with Alexis Pauline Gumbs
    6:00 pm-8:00 pm
    10/09/2019

    104 17th Ave S Seattle 98144

    104 17th Ave S Seattle 98144

    Looking for a grounded voice during a chaotic time in the US? Join an author talk with Dr. Alexis Pauline Gumbs that includes a sneak peek of her new book Dub: Finding Ceremony and her groundbreaking book M Archive. These two books and Spill: Scenes of Black Feminist Fugitivity make up a groundbreaking trilogy. M Archive documents Black life at the end of the world—melding a critique of late capitalism, anti-Blackness, and environmental crisis all at once. In Dub, Gumbs channels the voices of her ancestors, including whales, coral, and oceanic bacteria to tell stories of Diaspora, Indigeneity, migration, Blackness, genius, mothering, grief, and harm.

    Gumbs often traces the brilliance and wisdom of Black feminist practice, while taking on the origins of colonialism, genocide, and slavery. Through her writing, she reminds us that oppression can be challenged and that it is possible to make ourselves and our planet anew.

    Biography 
    Dr. Alexis Pauline Gumbs holds a Ph.D. in English, African and African-American Studies, and Women and Gender Studies from Duke University. This queer Black troublemaker is a Black feminist love evangelist and a prayer poet priestess. She is also the first scholar to research the Audre Lorde Papers at Spelman College, the June Jordan Papers at Harvard University, and the Lucille Clifton Papers at Emory University during her dissertation research.

11
  • ORCA for All launch event
    6:00 pm-8:00 pm
    11/09/2019

    215 Columbia St., ste 300 Seattle

    215 Columbia St., ste 300 Seattle

    Join us for the launch of a new campaign called ORCA for All!

    ORCA for All envisions a near future when every resident and every worker in Seattle and King County has an unlimited transit pass in hand.

    Mobility is a human right. Transportation connects people to housing, shelter, jobs, food, healthcare, education, friends and family, cultural and faith communities, recreation and civic life— all the things humans need to live with dignity and to flourish. For the many who depend on public transit, especially in low-income communities and communities of color, access to a robust public transit system is both a need and a right.

    Climate crisis demands urgent action. Half of Seattle’s rising carbon emissions come from passenger transportation. Over half of commute trips in our city are still made by driving alone. A rapid shift towards low-carbon modes of transportation, notably public transit, is needed to avert climate catastrophe.

    Living up to these principles will require aggressive investment in infrastructure for transit, biking, walking and rolling; expansion of transit service that is frequent, reliable, fast, and runs 24 hours a day; new disincentives to driving alone; and massively more affordable housing to halt the suburbanization of poverty and shorten the distances people must travel to meet their needs.

    But another, equally vital piece of the puzzle is ensuring that all people are enabled, encouraged, and incentivized to use our public transit system. We are calling on employers, governments, and individuals to all do their part.

  • Town Hall event: A Indigenous Peoples’ History of the US for Young People
    7:30 pm-9:00 pm
    11/09/2019

    720 Seneca St., Seattle

    720 Seneca St., Seattle

    The history of America as a country goes beyond that of a land “discovered” by a few brave men in the “New World.” Indigenous human rights advocate Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz joins us at Town Hall to reveal the roles that settler colonialism and policies of American Indian genocide played in forming our national identity. Dunbar-Ortiz is joined by Seattle-based educator and activist Nikkita Oliver to present an examination of the legacy of Indigenous peoples’ resistance, resilience, and steadfast fight against imperialism. Together they explore An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States for Young People, a comprehensive adaptation of Dunbar-Ortiz’s essential work restructured for middle-grade and young adult readers to include discussion topics, archival images, original maps, recommendations for further reading, and more. Join Dunbar-Ortiz and Oliver for an examination of our nation’s legacy and a chance to think critically about our place in history.

12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
October
October
October
October
October