Monthly Archives: November 2010

Gen Y and PT

From MSNBC, via my neighbor, Casey (and Bus Nerd):

Meet Natalie McVeigh, the auto industry’s latest headache.

At 25 years old, McVeigh lives in Denver and has two good jobs, as a research analyst and an adjunct professor of philosophy. What she doesn’t have — or want — is a car.

A confluence of events — environmental worries, a preference for gadgets over wheels and the yearslong economic doldrums — is pushing some teens and twentysomethings to opt out of what has traditionally been considered an American rite of passage: Owning a car.

Read the rest…

Guess that mad man wasn’t so mad after all.

A bus contest!

Think you ride America’s best bus route? Submit a photo and brief description to this contest (sponsored by Good Magazine and NYC’s Transportation Alternatives), and you could win a fabulous prize package!

What is it about your bus route that you love? Is your bus driver brilliant? Is the view from your window breathtaking? Do your fellow riders characters belong in a Hemingway novel?

Show and tell us why your bus route is the best in America.

Take a photo with your camera phone (no fancy cameras please) and send it to us with a 140 character or less caption by Wednesday, November 10.

Photos should be taken with camera phones and each caption should include the location and route. Please include your name and the best way to reach you.

Email your entry to:
Tweet your entry to: @GOOD and use the hashtag #bestbusride
[More details here]

I would totally enter my Smooth Jazz ride, except that I’m one of the judges. (I think I’ve died and gone to bus chick heaven.) Get those entries in, folks!

My girl: ready to roll, as always

Happy birthday, Chicklet!

Sweet Chicklet turns three today. In honor: my first Grist column is all about busing with babies–er, I mean big kids.

An excerpt:

Since our daughter, Rosa was born, three years ago today, we’ve been Metro parents. Rosa took her first bus trip home from the hospital at one day old and has ridden almost daily ever since. What I’ve learned is that there are significant challenges to parenting without a car. This is not because there’s anything inherently unhealthy or inconvenient about taking kids on public transit, but because most U.S. cities, including mine, were built (or rebuilt) to accommodate cars. I’ve also learned that opting to continue our bus-based life was an excellent choice for our children’s health and well-being. Here’s why. Read the rest…